Kyoto’s Hanamachi – Maiko, Geiko and Wagasa

In Kyoto today, there are five hanamachi: Gion Kobe, Miyagawa-cho, Ponto-cho, Kamishichiken, and Gion Higashi, collectively known as “Gokamachi.
The culture of heartfelt hospitality provided by geiko and maiko through their dance and other traditional arts has been passed down from generation to generation, and Kyoto’s Hanamachi have flourished as a major center of hospitality culture as a town where Kyoto’s traditional culture has been carefully preserved.

Kyoto’s Hanamachi is a condensation of traditional culture and hospitality culture, including traditional performing arts, and has received high acclaim not only from within Japan but also from overseas for its brilliant and sophisticated culture nurtured with an emphasis on authenticity.

The hairstyles and kimonos that complement geiko and maiko, the traditional Japanese instruments such as the shamisen and flute, and the decorations that adorn the stage and the tatami room.
The “skills” of traditional craftsmen who make kimono, obi, ornamental hairpins, etc., as well as hairdressers and dressers, are condensed in the “skills” of these craftsmen. These “skills,” which have been passed down from hand to hand, have been refined and refined in the elegant culture of Kyoto, including the flower district.
Tsujikura’s wagasa is one of them. Maiko (apprentice geisha) wear kyobori color jyanome-gasa, and geiko (apprentice geisha) wear purple or any other color of their choice.

和傘をさす京都の舞妓
和傘をさす京都の舞妓
和傘をさす京都の舞妓
和傘 名入れ

When maiko and geiko went to an ochaya (teahouse), they would put their names on the same janomegasa (umbrella) so that they would not be mistaken for the same one.
In this way, various traditional Kyoto crafts can be seen everywhere in Hanamachi, and it can be said that Kyoto’s highly skilled traditional crafts support the culture of Hanamachi. The “Culture of Kyoto Hanamachi: Traditional Crafts and Hospitality” has been selected as one of the “Intangible Cultural Heritages Linking Kyoto”. (From “Intangible Cultural Heritage Linking Kyoto”)

Umbrellas used on this page

Janome (Slender umbrella) $594.51

This is a Japanese umbrella with a traditional crescent moon pattern from ancient times. The stopper that adjusts the opening and closing of the umbrella is also made of wood. This is Tsujikura's most popular product, made mainly of bamboo, handmade Japanese paper, and wood.

Janome (Slender umbrella)

Kyo-beni (Red) / High Quality

Janome (Slender umbrella) $227.30

Janome (Slender umbrella)

Dark Red (White circle)

Janome (Slender umbrella) $437.14

Product List

Janome (Slender umbrella) $594.51

This umbrella is made of handmade Japanese paper dyed in the color of dew grass and bamboo, and is hand-made by skilled craftsmen. Only a few of these are produced each year.

Janome (Slender umbrella) $367.19

Janome (Slender umbrella) $594.51

This is a Japanese umbrella with a traditional crescent moon pattern from ancient times. The stopper that adjusts the opening and closing of the umbrella is also made of wood. This is Tsujikura's most popular product, made mainly of bamboo, handmade Japanese paper, and wood.

Janome (Slender umbrella) $594.51

Higasa (Japanese parasol) $367.19

This is the strongest Japanese parasol with both durability and beauty, made of sturdy Kuroya Unryu paper hand-made for Japanese parasols by Tsujikura craftsmen.

Janome (Slender umbrella) $638.22

Janome (Slender umbrella) $332.22

Janome (Slender umbrella) $332.22

Janome (Slender umbrella)

Kyo-beni (Red) / High Quality

Janome (Slender umbrella) $227.30